Summer 2019 Courses

MT602 HEALTHCARE ETHICS AND BIOETHICS (Tu 6-9pm May 28-July16) Dr. Klofft

This course will present a survey covering the core principles and most important issues related to Catholic bioethics. The course will begin with an overview of foundational Catholic moral theology grounded in virtue theory, with particular attention paid to conscience and especially relevant moral principles. It will then cover specific issues in healthcare and bioethics with a focus on the nature of healthcare, beginning of life issues, and end of life issues. Specific discussions will cover the physician-patient relationship, abortion, reproductive technologies, transhumanism, organ donation, physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia, and the definition and meaning of death. Readings will be drawn from Church documents, the Catechism of the Catholic Church, and various articles related to specific topics.

Credit ($1,350) Audit ($400)

PC 602 MINISTRY OF CONSOLATION: BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN THEORY AND PRACTICE (Wed 6–9 pm May 29–July 17) Prof. Hauck and Dr. Lingertat

This two-credit elective will focus on significant changes in our understanding of grief. This has considerable influence on how we practice ministry in meaningful and effective ways. The course explores significant research which affect liturgy, parish support groups, and how we reach out to the bereaved. Topics include: the continual bonds with those who have died and a deep appreciation of the Communion of Saints, how we process our losses going beyond tasks, phases, and steps and meaning seeking and meaning making. Creating and developing consolation ministries in the ecclesial setting.

Credit ($1,350) Audit ($400)

MT551 THEOLOGY OF THE BODY Dr. A. Franks
First week -Mon, Wed Aug 5 & 7 (6-9 pm) and Sat Aug 10 (9am-12 noon)
Second week-Mon thru Fri Aug 12-16 (6-9 pm)

This course will engage students in a close reading of key texts by Pope Saint John Paul II: Love and Responsibility and, in particular, the theology of the body. It will examine the relationship between nature and person in the anti-Humanae Vitae worldview and indicate its roots in the thought of Bacon and Descartes before contrasting this Cartesian perspective with that of Paul VI in Humanae Vitae and John Paul II.

Credit ($1,350) Audit ($400)

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